This is a collection of reports and papers that were used to develop the Framework for Integrated and Habitat Evaluation (FISHE), as well as a selection of supporting materials that can be used during the six steps of the data-limited framework. Use the search function below to search for specific resources.

  • 21.
    We developed an approach to progress the [ecosystem-based fisheries management] EBFM mandate in Australia, using a new ecological risk assessment framework applied to fisheries, termed Ecological Risk Assessment for the Effects of Fishing (ERAEF). Novel features of this framework include its hierarchical structure and its precautionary approach to uncertainty. The amount of information required increases through the hierarchy, and allows application in data-limited situations.
  • 22.
    Coral reefs are ecosystems with documented fishing thresholds. Fisheries in these systems can thus be managed to remain above these limits, reducing the risk of system collapse. Use the calculator in this worksheet to determine the fish biomass ratio (kilograms/hectare) of your coral reef system and compare with the ratios for the Indian Ocean and Caribbean Sea in the tables provided.
  • 23.
    This spreadsheet is intended to be used during application of the MPA Decision Tree assessment method. Users should also download the associated literature, and the "primer" we've developed, and ensure that they have a comprehensive understanding of this material before proceeding.
  • 24.
    The percentage of unfished lifetime egg production (LEP) has been used to represent persistence in precautionary fisheries management, but estimation of this reference point requires substantial data and it is sensitive to errors in natural mortality rate. We present an estimation method that quantifies the change in LEP by a fishery when only length frequency samples, one early in the fishery and one recent, are available for assessment.
  • 25.
    Simulation and empirical analyses were conducted to evaluate the utility and robustness of average length (Lbar) of animals in the exploited population as an estimator of fishing mortality (F), and therefore as an indicator of exploitation status for Florida coral-reef fish.
  • 26.
    These example performance indicators and blank templates are intended to be used during the adaptive management planning process. Users should also download the provided paper, Adaptive Fisheries Management for Nearshore Fisheries, in order to ensure that they have a comprehensive understanding of this process. We advise that this process be stakeholder driven in order to ensure transparency around actions that will be taken under each of the potential scenarios.
  • 27.
    Initial paper presenting the Schaefer Biomass Dynamics assessment method: From morphometric data, tagging results and reaction of the stock to fishing, it is inferred that the yellowfin tuna of the Eastern Pacific form a distinct population which intermingles little, if at all, with populations to the westward. Excellent statistics of catch and effort, and records of total catch, available since 1934, during rapid growth of the fishery, have made possible application of a generalized mathematical predator-prey model to estimate the effect of fishing on the population, and the average abundance and yield corresponding to different amounts of fishing effort, and also to estimate the rate of fishing mortality per unit of effort. From serial samples of size composition of catches, and from tagging experiments, it has been possible to determine rates of growth and of total mortality. These kinds of information permit application of the catch-per-recruit model of Beverton and Holt. Combination of the results of application of the Beverton and Holt model and of the generalized predator-prey model, leads to inference of the relationship between stock size and recruitment. The form of the relationship is remarkably similar to the theoretical model developed by W. E. Ricker. These studies, based on the data of the near-surface fishery by baitboats and purse seiners, indicate clearly that the increased intensity of fishing has caused diminution of the stocks to the point where they are somewhat "overfished"-that is, incapable of supporting the maximum sustainable average harvest.
  • 28.
    FishPath is a decision support system that allows users to characterize their fishery with respect to (i) available data; (ii) biological/life history attributes of relevant species; (iii) fishery operational characteristics; (iv) socioeconomic characteristics; and (v) governance context. FishPath allows users to identify a subset of management strategy options appropriate for the fishery based on this characterization.
  • 29.
    Excel workbook to support the application of the Froese Length-Based Sustainability Indicators, which uses length-frequency catch data to estimate three simple indicators of stock status and trends.
  • 30.
    Here we review [assessment] methods...gleaned from the literature, for establishing reference points for data-poor situations. We present a new framework to help managers and stakeholders consider and choose appropriate analytical methods and alternative management approaches, based on available data (type, quantity, and quality) and feasibility constraints (scale, value and implementation costs). We highlight limitations and considerations for each method and illustrate the use of our framework by presenting case-study examples.

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